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. what we had the eyes on the other asteroid, i knew something like this would happen. nasa facing cut, and for once, i wonder if we should be spending. when they say it's not, it's always about "money." ♪ all right, starting off tonight with the plan to push off the sequester and save us all, senate democrats announced the new alternative to a $110 billion bill to replace the spending cuts until january 2 of 20 # 14, and there's already a lot of criticism, surprise, surprise, but as it stands, we are just 14 days away from when the deep across the board cuts are set to take effect. with me, now, is today's austin power panel. we have gretchen, better market ceo, dennis, and rich, "forbes" contributor. what do you think the democrats planned? >> look, it's the beginning, a negotiating appointment, dead on arrival, will never happen, but elements of it are interesting. melissa: like what? what do yolike? >> i like the scaled down cuts to defense. i like the fact that we're timely maybe starting to talk about cutting farm subsidies. i think at the end of the day there's no chance that
, congress directed the federal agencies including the faa and nasa collaborating in accelerating the integration of uas into the national air space. the faa modernization and reform act of 2012 contains provisions designed to promote and facilitate the use of civilian unmanned aircraft. we, on the subcommittee, know that you've been working hard and have made progress towards meeting the prescribed objectives, but we also know that there are many unresolved issues, both technologically and regulatorily. again, i go to the goal today to have the research to overcome technology issues and mitigate risk involved with uas integration into the national air space system. we're particularly interested in hearing about any advances towards eliminating as a as a vulnerabilities. the agreements on technological standards and the "washington post" reported nine american uas crashes occurred near civilian airports overseas as a result of pilot ere -- error. there's poor coordination with air traffic controllers. in august 2010, the "new york times" reported that a navy uas violated air space
nasa. it was more of a member is of and a from his sons couple close friends. the eulogies were mostly about his humility. that is what i remember most about neil. one of the most humble guys i ever met, most self-effacing, never bragged. never thought about looked at me, i am first on the moon. and it probably the most talented guy i knew as far as pilot skills go. >> you were if prior -- you were a fighter pilot. >> right, and so was he, in korea. then he got out of the navy. so he was an accomplished pilot when he came to nasa. i think if anybody should have been first on the moon, it was neil armstrong because he had the skill and the humility to carry that load. >> we talked last night at dinner. when you were flying at the lunar module down, commander is on one side and the other guy is on the other side. it makes it easier for one person to get out first. talked-about -- talk about that. >> who's gonna be first out? the lunar module pilot is on the right side as the face forward. the commander is on the left side. and you are standing. it takes a couple hours to get to take up -
in the integration. last year congress directed the federal agent fees, including the faa and nasa collaborated in accelerating integration into the national airspace. the faa modernization and reform act of 2012 can tames provision designed to promote and facilitate use of civilian unmanned aircraft. we have a subcommittee know you've been working hard and it made progress towards meeting the prescribed object days, but we also know there are many unresolved issues, both technologically and regulatory lead. again, our goal today is to better understand the research underway to overcome technological issues and mitigate risk involved with uas integration into the national airspace system. we are particularly interested in hearing about any advances towards eliminating vulnerabilities in command and control communications. new capabilities in and agreements on technological standards. the "washington post" recently reported that he sent american crashes occurred near civilian airports overseas as a result of pilot error. mechanical failure, poor coordination of air traffic controllers. in august
. bill: according to nasa, 100 tons of meet toors of gravel and dust hit the atmosphere and the earth every single day. the smaller strikes what we saw in russia happen ten times a year. that's new. scientists believe a strike by a meteor six miles across may have been responsible for extinction of the dinosaurs 66 million years ago. in case you're wondering on a friday have something to do over the weekend you mentioned the asteroid talking about past several days. they say there is no connection between that and this meteor. we'll talk to scientists throughout the morning. heather: a lot of experts. bill: meantime, six minutes past, the nightmare is finally over. what a slow crawl this was. thousands of passengers cheering the end of a cruise ship horror scene. touching land and kissing it like the pope. the carnival cruise triumph docking last night in mobile after putting what passengers through what they call disgusting conditions. now they say they are just happy to be home. who can blame them. >> i feel great to be off the ship and just being on land and, i get to see my family
time in history, nasa gathers a rock sample from mars. the curiosity rover drilled a hole into a rock used its robotic arm this weekend. the rock is believed to be proof that there was once water on that planet. the rover will process the sample over the next few days. >>> the hottest dog show in the country picks off tomorrow. a dog from anne arundel county is competing in the westminster kennel club. tonight we meet blanket rocket ship. >> reporter: as he sits waiting for his last minute preb he's ready. >> he likes to -- prep he's ready. >> he likes to look good. >> yes he does. >> reporter: to take the westminster dog show by form. >> he has a lot of fun as a dog the day before because he's not allowed to sniff or play with dogs the next day. >> reporter: fluffy, 93 pound bermese mountain dog will be entered in the working dog group. this trip to new york is impressive. it is the first time westminster has allowed a non-champion to compete. >> we a super excited to be there. it's a long shot that he'll win. it's possible. anything is possible. but we have so excited just to be at
that are projected to a flat plan, we take pictures around an object so you get 3d digital model. nasa's case, we scanned the image of insulated tile and then we create repair, that's idea call shape of the damage. this data gets sent up to space station and they cut it out with the repair and the spacewalker can go out, fit it in, seal it, and then the damage is repaired. >> and we've got some props on the desk. tell me about what you brought us today. >> okay. so this is a 3d printed shoe and we're experimenting the art, which is a mesh of many object. the material, lighter weight with a lot of empty spaces. in the heel, and then also it is molded to the shape of my feet so it's completely custom made. >> ping, good to have you on the program. thank you so much. >>> up next, the coming news in the upcoming week that will be have impact "on the money." and is the city of new york city takeout in jeopardy? may michael bloomberg's list of banned substances as we take a break. look at how the stock market ended the week. back in a moment. look at how th market ended the week. back in a moment. look
with our telescopes. thanks to australia and nasa we can see imagery coming in from the eastern hemisphere. astronomers worldwide are watching, excited but not too worried. >> this asteroid is half a football field long but roughly the size of a 12 story building like this. and that is big enough to wipe out a city. but scientists say that is not going to happen. the real threat here though, is to communication satellites like the ones we use at fox news. the geosynchronous at 22,000 miles around the earth. at 1:24 eastern this asteroid penetrated the plane. there is no report of a satellite hit. it must exit the plane at 2:24 eastern. but scientists do not expect any collisions to happen. this is not only one out there. they are flying near earth's orbit. astronomers and telescopes around the planet are always looking up. >> we've seen and tracked about 9,000 of them right now. and about a thousand of them are potentially hazardous. so we look at those carefully. it turns out we're safe from those for many hundreds of years. >> the 1908 event in russia which leveled, wiped out forests for
of the meteorite's powerful landing. right now nasa is keeping close watch over an asteroid as it hurdles about 17,000 miles above the earth's surface. a record-setting approach near our planet and apparently it's under 50 feet wide. tom costello joins me from the newsroom. tom, what do we know so far about what happened in russia? >> it was absolutely unbelievable. it was spectacular. what's kind of interesting here is so many people in russia these days have these little go pro cameras because they want to capture when they're hit in a traffic accident or official corruption. we have many views of this asteroid traveling at 33,000 miles per hour slamming into the earth's atmosphere above southwestern russia. this happened at 9:15 this morning. this town has a million people in it. thankfully most of the debris actually fell outside of the town, but it blew out the windows in nearly every single building and in many, many homes, and keep in mind, these are soviet era designs, so they're not terribly well built. a short time ago i talked to a canadian who was living there in that particular part o
as an asteroid that came exceedingly close to earth, at least in space terms. as this nasa animation shows, the asteroid was just over 17,000 miles away from earth, traveling at about eight miles per second, actually inside a ring of television and weather satellites that surround the planet. named da-14, the asteroid was half the size of a football field. it passed, we can happily report, without incident. here to tell us about both events is astrophysicist and author neil degrasse tyson, director of the hayden planetarium in new york city. let's start with what happened in russia. how unusual was that in terms of size and impact? >> well, we couldn't know precisely how common that would be. all we can do is sort of look back at other sort of reported such events. for example, there was an air blast that happened in the airspace over india and pakistan back in 1990s. which happened to occur while they were in intense conversations about their nuclear buildup of arm ament. and so such a blast mimics greatly what would happened with the nuclear blast. it is an instant deposit of energy in t
out of the government come from nasa or the military. and that's what we're seeing working. of course, a lot of spaghetti taxpayer dollars thrown against the wall. the market don't want electric cars or electric battery cars. it leaves them feeling like they'll be stranded in the woods without any gas or any power to get out of the woods. it stresses them out. so we talk a lot also about nat gas, yes, it's helped by the federal government, but that was a resource that was sitting there. electric batteries had to be developed by people with a lot of taxpayer money. >> morgan, even folks like from the "washington post," charles lane, was talking about how americans just don't want electric cars. for all the money we pour, for all the tax breaks we give to people who buy them, americans still don't want them because they deliver inferior performance at a much higher cost, like much of what the government does. >> yeah. so going back to my point, we streamline where we're make these investments and there is a wealth of data that shows that some of these investments have been very wasteful
of an atomic bomb, injuring a thousand people. nasa says the meteor was the size of a building and moving at 40,000 miles an hour. >> the repeat occurrence, it definitely has me up here. >> what do you know about asteroids? >> i know they can be dangerous. >> another asteroid is passing close to the earth. the closest any asteroid has ever gotten to the earth. they got a fuzzy dot on video screen, 17,000 miles is so close that astronomers says the earth's gravity is bending its path. >> it has some potential but not an immediate potential of hitting the earth. >> a lot of activity in the past 24 hours but astronomers say it's a wonderful coincidence. >> katie: if you snapped a picture of last night's meteor we would love to see it. send it to ureport. >>> it certainly unlikely that a meteor would hit your house, but if it did are you covered by insurance. michael finney got some answers. >> that is one of the things that is covered under your homeowner's insurance policy. it doesn't happen that often but it is something that would be covered. >> kelly, an insurance industry spokesman, damage fr
with the power of an atomic bomb, injuring more than 1,000 people, mostly from broken glass. n.a.s.a. said the meteor was about the size of a building and moving at 40,000 miles per hour. >> the recent occurrences isly what makes it interesting. it's definitely what has we up here. >> what do you know about astroids? >> i know they can be dangerous. >> meanwhile another astroid is passing very close to the earth. it's the closest any astroid has ever gotten to the earth. stargazers came out to get a glimpse of a fuzzy dot on a video screen. 17,000 miles seems like a long distance but it's so close the earth that astronomers see hits gravity has the potential of change its path. >> astronomers say it's a wonderful coincidence. reporting from the space and science center in oakland, i'm allen wong, abc7 news. >> if you snapped a picture of last night's youor, we would love to see it. just send it to us. >> if a meteor hit your home, are you covered by an insurance? michael finney got some answers. >> it is one of the things definitely covered under the homeowners policy. a lot of people does
bomb, injuring more than 1,000 people, mostly from broken glass. n.a.s.a. said the meteor was about the size of a building and moving at 40,000 miles per hour. >> the recent occurrences is probably what makes it interesting. it's definitely what has we up here. >> what do you know about astroids? >> i know they can be dangerous. >> meanwhile another astroid is passing very close to the earth. it's the closest any astroid has ever gotten to the earth. stargazers came out to get a glimpse of a fuzzy dot on a video screen. 17,000 miles seems like a long distance, but it's so close the earth that astronomers see hits gravity has the potential of pending it's path. >> astronomers say it's a wonderful coincidence. reporting from the space and science center in oakland, i'm allen wong, abc7 news. >> if you snapped a picture of last night's meteor, we would love to see it. just send it to us. u report at kgo-tv.com. >> it's certainly unlikely that a meteor would ever hit your home, but if it did, are you covered by an insurance? michael finney got some answers. >> it is one of the things de
. an engineering grad student and former member of the nasa student ambassador program. his family says green had a mental illness. >> the family let our detectives know that this suspect had this condition for at least a year. and that in the past, he had been prescribed medication for this mental illness. >> reporter: this happened around 1:00 this morning at a rental house close by the college park campus. police say that green set fires in and around the house in an apparent effort to draw his roommates outside. when the two room mates came out, they say green opened fire. he killed one and wounded another and then turned the gun on himself. >> around 1:00 a.m. we heard about ten shots fired. and we couldn't figure out if it was gunshots or firecrackers. >> reporter: police say that the gun green used he purchased legally. apparently after he was diagnosed with mental illness. and in addition to the murder weapon police say green also had a bag containing a baseball bat. a machete. a loaded semiautomatic weapon, and? extra ammunition. so sad this scene the university president came to the nei
as the snow encasing him down that mountain. >>> the ceo of apple and a nasa engineer sat with michelle obama. you can't sit close to your wife surrounding her with nerds. >> "cbs this morning." >> i literally couldn't move my legs so they'd have to pick up my legs and put them into my next outfit. >> whoa, now there is he aa job. >>> welcome to "cbs this morning." we start with breaking news the sweeping manhunt for fugitive ex-cop wanted in a deadly rampage appears to be over. overnight sheriff's deputies say charred remains were found inside a burned out cabin near big bear lake california east of los angeles. it's not yet confirmed the remains are those of christopher dorner. >> the cabin went up in flames after an intense shoot-out. only cbs news captured the gunfight while it was happening. carter evans was in the middle of it all and he is again in big bear. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, there is a new development. authorities are now reporting inside that burnt out cabin they found a california driver's license with the name "christopher dorner" on i
last year. what else could we do with the money? you could fund nasa an entire year. you could buy linkedin and even have cash left over. lori: i'm rich in love, good friends, family. don't need to spend. melissa: good for you. good for you. lori: with all the money spent on gifts today you might be surprised it hear the government might be contributing to higher costs for sweets. here is rich edson in washington to tell us why. >> we're here in washington, d.c. i walked past here last night, wow -- this is really last-minute shoppers. [inaudible] raise the price of end product. and so they are basically saying that, what happens with that end product is it boosts the price of sugar, all those import controls. the sugar industry says you have got other governments inflating the price here because they are subsidizing in their countries. this is a statement from the american sugar alliance saying much of the pressure to hand over the u.s. sugar market to foreign suppliers is driven by large food manufacturers looking to oversupply the u.s. market, depress sugar prices and boost thei
died off. dr. collins and his team will have been frozen for three years. nasa, we just went through the 10th anniversary of the challenger explosion. those astronauts that sit on that rocket, those and now in the future, if you have a nasa facility in your district and they sit on that rocket to go up, they froze for three years. firefighters out in the west when the storms come this summer and they are coming, the firefighters you call on them and beg them to come in and fight. and the weather service, those of you from florida and the tornado area and hurricanes area, the weathermen stay around the clockworking, frozen for three years. border patrol, brian terry, the people that work with him that are on the border where gangs, violent gangs coming across the border, brosen. for three -- frozen for three years. d.e.a. and others. the doctors out at walter reed, if you go out and visit walter reed or go visit your v.a. hospital, the doctors and the nurses that are working with the wounded warriors, people who have lost their limbs in afghanistan and iraq, frozen for three years. wi
system, nasa's space exploration program, and noaa's work on necessary new satellites. these are weather satellite programs. these are sequestration's negative impacts. the diverse group of leaders here with us today is going to be attesting to this. regarding the overall economy, about six months ago we released a study conducted by dr. stephen fuller of george mason university. the study's methodology is sound and its conclusions are grim. if sequestration is going forward, it will put 2.1 million u.s. jobs at risk. these are defense and non- defense-related jobs, and include nearly 1 million small businesses. it will cost the unemployment rate to rise about 1.5%, and reduce expected gdp growth by $215 billion. $215 billion. the latest congressional budget office forecast reinforces the conclusion, that sequestration will undermine economic growth. today we are re-releasing dr. fuller's study and his analysis of the impact of impact of sequestration. let it be noted no one can say that they were not forewarned about the full consequences of this very bad policy. this morning, to emphas
damaging. nasa and others assure us that it will not. but there is some risk that it could pop into one or more satellites. and that could change everything from gps to communications. so you have to be ready for surprises. >> is this why volume is so light, even though -- >> people are in their bunkers? >> everybody's hunkering down in front of the asteroid. no, i think the volume is light, because we're right at an uptrend line. and we're either consolidating for a break-through, which would be very important, or we're stalling and pulling back. if you go back into may of 2011, we've hit this uptrend line several times. and each time we've had a pullback that was not insignificant. >> that's funny, the journal points out, we hit 14 k on february 1st, and since then, we've gone up 141 times. you've made the point before, these psychological levels are like the hard door, and the battering ram has to hit them a few times, more than once. >> it is. people have to feel more relaxed about the fact that we've gotten here, we're moving through. you know, for old-time traders, we're not only
's atmosphere. it was traveling at around 33,000 miles an hour. nasa says the meteor released 20 amount the force of the hiroshima bombs. stress sweat. it's different than ordinary sweat. it smells worse, and it can happen any time -- to anyone! like when i fell asleep at movie night with all my coworkers and i totally dream snorted myself awake. i actually popped my head back so fast i'm pretty sure i have whiplash. stress sweat can happen to anyone, anytime -- and it smells worse than ordinary sweat. get 4x the protection against stress sweat. introducing new secret clinical strength stress response scent. ♪ starts with arthritis pain and a choice. take tylenol or take aleve, the #1 recommended pain reliever by orthopedic doctors. just two aleve can keep pain away all day. back to the news. >>> federal prosecutors have charged former illinois congressman jesse jackson, jr., for allegedly misusing hundreds of thousands in campaign funds for personal expenses. jackson is said to be accepting a plea deal. his wife, sandy, faces one count of tax fraud herself. >>> in today's "office pol
. lawrence seaway. he created nasa, which led the way to the kennedy years in going to the moon. barack, the federal troops to protect school girls going to school and dealing with the implementation of brown. the virtues of eisenhower were quite strong. n a thirdhave won third to term. host: this from twitter. guest: well, of course, depending on how you look at things. some people vote for the lesser of two evils. many dreamed for a third party s.at never quite cohere the leader roosevelt had a party -- theodore roosevelt had a party because people did not want to vote for taft or wilson. he could not win with a third party. george wallace grabbed a hold of the south. h. ross perot got 19% of the vote. there are times enough people say, i cannot vote for either of these guys any third-party movement starts coherent but they usually only get so far. host: what about the role of congress at the time of the president's second term? this comes from twitter from sharonb. guest: well,look. there is truth to that. you have to have a president that is willing to do business. bill clinton made
system. nasa's space exploration program, and work on necessary new satellites. these are weather satellite programs. these are sequestration's negative impacts. the diverse group of leaders here with us today are going to be attesting to this. regarding the overall economy, about six months ago be released a study conducted by dr. stephen fuller of george mason university. the study bus methodology is conclusions are grim. it's as sequestration if going forward will put 2.1 million u.s. jobs at risk. these are defense and non- defense-related jobs, and include nearly 1 million small businesses. it will cost the unemployment rate to rise about 1.5%, and reduce expected gdp growth by $215 billion. $215 billion. the latest congressional budget office forecast -- be oak reinforces the conclusion, that sequestration will undermine economic growth. today we are read-releasing dr. fuller's study and his analysis of the impact of impact of sequestration. let it be noted no one can say that they were not for ward about the full consequences of this very bad policy. this morning, to emphas
are affected as well. for example, faa's operation of the national aerospace system, nasa's space exploration program, and no was work on necessary new satellite, weather satellite program. these are sequestration's negative impacts and they raise will be on national security. the diverse group of leaders with us today are going to be a testing to this. we are going passionate about six month ago we released a study conducted by doctor stephen forte of george mason university. the study's methodology has found and in its conclusions are grim. the study says that sequestration if it goes forward will put 2.1 million jobs at risk. these are defense and nondefense related jobs, and they include nearly 1 million small businesses. what caused the unemployment rate to rise by 1.5% and reduce expected gdp growth by $215 billion, 215 billion. the latest congressional budget office forecast, cbo, reinforces his conclusions that sequestration will significant undermine u.s. sustained growth. so, today, we are really releasing doctor for study and his analysis of these potential economic impacts of sequ
, that the nasa got to run the space program without o.m.b. folks saying you do this, you do that. are senator rockefeller cheers to the committee. i want to thank you for that. because what you did was -- you smoothed it out so that senator kay bailey hutchinson and i and we got direction for the space program three years ago that otherwise was in turmoil. that is in no small measure to what you did. i want the folks to know that is what you did and i want you to know how much this senator appreciates it. i want to ask you -- we got all of this international finance stirring. a lot of it is going to run under your authority. give me your thoughts on it. >> the international financial situation is one that we do have to watch closely. as much as we try to do our own business, we can't separate ourself from the world entirely. we can make sure our financial institutions are sound, we can make sure we run our policies appropriately. look at europe. they are the largest export partner. if they have a financial crisis that is something we have to worry about. if confirmed, i would work on but i've
started to massage and perhaps is the best way that the nasa administrator scot to run the space program without the omb folks saying you do this, you do that pursuant to directives given in the act which senator rockefeller chairs the commerce committee. and i want to thank you for that because what you did, use move the debt out so that the senator kay bailey hutchison and i could bring unanimity and we got a better option for the space program three years ago that other wise was in turmoil and that is in her no small measure to what you did. i want the folks to know that what you did and how much the center appreciates it. i want to ask you a -- we have all of this international finance stirring and a lot of it is going to run under. to give me your thoughts on that. >> senator, the international financial situation is one that we do have to watch very closely. as much as we try to do our own business we can't separate ourselves from the world entirely. we can make sure that our financial institutions are sound and that we run our policy is appropriately. europe is our largest export
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)